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Art and the Mystery of Existence: Paleolithic and Neolithic Art
ART and the Afterlife I: Egyptian Art and Architecture
Art and the Afterlife II: The Ancient Near East
Art and Mythology I: Cycladic, Minoan, Archaic Greek
Art and Mythology II: Greek Art and Architecture
Art and Empire: Roman Art and Architecture
Art and Salvation I: Early Christian to Gothic Art
Art and Salvation II: The Early Renaissance
Art in the Age of Humanism: The High Renaissance
Art of Theatricality and Drama: The Baroque
Art of Reason and Passion: Neoclassicism and Romanticism
Art and the Collapse of Absolutes: Realism and Impressionism
Art of the Inner Soul: Post-Impressionism and Expressionism
Art of New Vision: Cubism to Abstract Expressionism
Art of Irony: Pop Art to Post-Modernism
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Art and the Human Experience

Professor Brian Edward Hack
Art 31: The Visual Experience

These "virtual galleries" contain all the main images we have studied in class. They are categorized by culture and time period in the same order as on your slide list. While studying these images, try to make visual, psychological, and philosophical connections between them. Consider what purpose each object or structure had during the time of its creation. What similarities do you find among the artworks of these cultures? What differences? How do different cultures and time periods choose to address similar issues? To begin your journey, choose a category from the list at left.

Michelangelo: Detail of the Last Judgment (Sistine Chapel), 1534-41.

The Thinker, by Auguste Rodin, c.1880. Click here to go to the Musee Rodin, Paris!